Hanji Pilgrimage from Korea to Ohio: Dard Hunter to Aimee Lee, 1933-2014

Flying duck, made of twisted paper. Photo courtesy Aimee Lee
Exhibition Dates: 
April 13- August 11, 2017

This exhibit presents the images taken and artifacts gathered in Korea in 1933 by Dard Hunter alongside the still and moving images and artwork by Aimee Lee inspired by her research visits to Korea in 2008-2009 and 2014. Hunter's 20th-century photographs of making hanji (Korean paper) remain to this day some of the most accessible and informative documentation of the process, used by Koreans themselves to educate the public about hanji. Lee's research in the 21st century uncovered not only the traditional steps in making hanji, but a host of paper arts that have been active in Korea over centuries. Her book, Hanji Unfurled (The Legacy Press, 2012) was inspired by Hunter's A Papermaking Pilgrimage to Japan, Korea and China (Pynson Printers, 1936). Upon her return to the U.S. from her Fulbright research trip, she built the first hanji studio in North America in Ohio, Hunter's home state. The artwork displayed in this show highlights the strength and versatility of hanji in traditional and contemporary forms, from dyed and textured sheets of paper to sculpture and garments. This lineage of research, making, and sharing information continues over 80 years to bring new insights about Korean paper heritage to today's audiences.